letdreamsbereality
When sex becomes a production or performance that is when it loses its value. Be mutual. Be loud. Be clumsy. Make noises, be quiet, and make a mess. Bite, scratch, push, pull, hold, thrust. Remove pressure from the moment. Love the moment. Embrace it. Enjoy your body; enjoy your partners’ body. Produce sweat, be natural, entice your senses, give into pleasure. Bump heads, miss when you kiss, laugh when it happens. Speak words, speak with your body, speak to their soul. Touch their skin, kiss their goose bumps, and play with their hair. Scream, beg, whimper, sigh, let your toes curl, lose yourself. Chase your breath; keep the lights on, watch their eyes when they explode. Forget worrying about extra skin, sizes of parts and things that are meaningless. Save the expectations, take each second as it comes. Smear your make up, mess up your hair, rid your masculinity, and lose your ego. Detonate together, collapse together, and melt into each other.
(via budddha)
vineforlife

vineforlife:

When you go to pick up Just 1 thing

crematedadolescent
isnotforyoureyes:

Bufo Toad has held a place in human mythologies and medicines worldwide since archaic times. Used and worshiped for a variety of purposes, its most spectacular effects, acording to lore, involve magical and shamanic or occult uses for casting spells and for divination. Olmecs depicts the Bufo toad as far back as 2000 BC. It is well known that at an Olmec burial cite in San Lorenzo archaeologists discovered huge numbers of Cane Toad (Bufo Marinus). It has been documented that these peoples consumed the toads for hallucinogenic purposes (Lyttle et al. 1996) It is important to note that this species’ parotide does not produce 5-MeO-DMT, but bufotenine, a tryptamine related to serotonin and similar to psilocin and DMT. This little clay sculpture is at Museo Nacional de Antropologia, Mexico City.

isnotforyoureyes:

Bufo Toad has held a place in human mythologies and medicines worldwide since archaic times. Used and worshiped for a variety of purposes, its most spectacular effects, acording to lore, involve magical and shamanic or occult uses for casting spells and for divination. Olmecs depicts the Bufo toad as far back as 2000 BC. It is well known that at an Olmec burial cite in San Lorenzo archaeologists discovered huge numbers of Cane Toad (Bufo Marinus). It has been documented that these peoples consumed the toads for hallucinogenic purposes (Lyttle et al. 1996) It is important to note that this species’ parotide does not produce 5-MeO-DMT, but bufotenine, a tryptamine related to serotonin and similar to psilocin and DMT. This little clay sculpture is at Museo Nacional de Antropologia, Mexico City.